CHAMPIONS

Scientific Name – ACACIA SEYAL (RED ACACIA) 100 GAL Common Name – RED ACACIA

  • ACACIA SEYAL (RED ACACIA) 100 GAL

tree profile

Height:12' - 14' Spread:5' - 6' Trunk Diameter:2 1/2' - 3'

Red Acacia is an evergreen, thorny, medium to large-sized tree which can potentially reach a height of 50 feet, but in cultivation is typically much smaller. It has a thick trunk up to 2 feet in diameter, with rust-colored powdery bark, and large spines and exudes a gum. Branches have smaller curved spines. It has an umbrella-shaped crown, flat on top, open and casting medium shade. Leaves are dark green, bipinnate, 3-4 inches long; individual leaflets are about 1/2 inch long. Flowers are borne on stems bunched together as showy fragrant yellow blooms on a rounded head, each bloom 5/8 inch in diameter. Bees are attracted to red acacia and it is considered a honey tree. Fruits are pods, dry, hard light brown when mature, 4-6 x 1/2 inch, containing several seeds, used for propagation. Seed pods and bark contain tannin. The gum and bark have medicinal use, and the wood has many historic uses as well as for fuel. Livestock feed on the bark, leaves and fruits. The tree is self-seeding or grows from root suckers. In cultivation, red acacia is a hardy tree which will grow in poor soils and withstands periodic flooding; it develops a deep tap root. As an ornamental tree, red acacia is a good accent or specimen tree with its attractive foliage and flowers. Caution must be taken about planting it close to where individuals may be injured by the large spines.

***medicinal uses***

The gum is believed to be aphrodisiac. The bark decoction is used for dysentery and leprosy. Tanganyikans use the bark as a stimulant in tropical africa. The gum is used as emollient and astringent for colds, diarrhea, hemorrhage and ophhthalmia. Mixed with acacia sieberana dc, it is used for intestinal ailments on the ivory coast. Wood used as a fumigant for rheumatic pains, and to protect puerperal mothers from colds and fevers. Eating the gum is supposed to afford some protection against bronchitis and rheumatism (duke, 1983a).

Scientific Name – Acacia seyal (Red Acacia) 50 Gal Common Name – Red Acacia

  • Acacia seyal (Red Acacia) 50 Gal

tree profile

Height:10' - 12' Spread:5' - 6' Trunk Diameter:1 1/2' - 2'

Red Acacia is an evergreen, thorny, medium to large-sized tree which can potentially reach a height of 50 feet, but in cultivation is typically much smaller. It has a thick trunk up to 2 feet in diameter, with rust-colored powdery bark, and large spines and exudes a gum. Branches have smaller curved spines. It has an umbrella-shaped crown, flat on top, open and casting medium shade. Leaves are dark green, bipinnate, 3-4 inches long; individual leaflets are about 1/2 inch long. Flowers are borne on stems bunched together as showy fragrant yellow blooms on a rounded head, each bloom 5/8 inch in diameter. Bees are attracted to red acacia and it is considered a honey tree. Fruits are pods, dry, hard light brown when mature, 4-6 x 1/2 inch, containing several seeds, used for propagation. Seed pods and bark contain tannin. The gum and bark have medicinal use, and the wood has many historic uses as well as for fuel. Livestock feed on the bark, leaves and fruits. The tree is self-seeding or grows from root suckers. In cultivation, red acacia is a hardy tree which will grow in poor soils and withstands periodic flooding; it develops a deep tap root. As an ornamental tree, red acacia is a good accent or specimen tree with its attractive foliage and flowers. Caution must be taken about planting it close to where individuals may be injured by the large spines.

***medicinal uses***

The gum is believed to be aphrodisiac. The bark decoction is used for dysentery and leprosy. Tanganyikans use the bark as a stimulant in tropical africa. The gum is used as emollient and astringent for colds, diarrhea, hemorrhage and ophhthalmia. Mixed with acacia sieberana dc, it is used for intestinal ailments on the ivory coast. Wood used as a fumigant for rheumatic pains, and to protect puerperal mothers from colds and fevers. Eating the gum is supposed to afford some protection against bronchitis and rheumatism (duke, 1983a).

Scientific Name – Azadirachta indica 100 Gal Common Name – Neem Tree

  • Azadirachta indica 100 Gal

tree profile

Height:12' - 14' Spread:6' Trunk Diameter:3"

Neem is a moderate-sized tree which reaches a height of 40 feet or more. It has a round to oval, spreading crown of wide branches and dense foliage. The dark green, evergreen leaves are opposite, pinnate, 8 - 16 inches long with 20 - 30 leaflets each 1 - 3 1/2 inches long with toothed edges. New leaves are reddish in color. Under severe drought conditions, the tree will lose most of its leaves. Flowers are borne in drooping clusters up to 10 inches long; blooms are white and fragrant, small about 2/5 inch wide. Fruits are smooth, olive-like in shape, green becoming yellow when ripe, about an inch long and suspended on a long stem. Fruits contain 1 - 3 seeds, which are used for propagation. Neem is a tree of great value in semiarid and arid areas because it provides numerous products. New leaves , flowers and fruits are edible; leaves and seed oil have numerous medicinal uses and are also natural insecticides; neem oil is a lubricant; the bark has a high tannin content and the wood is durable. Neem is widely planted worldwide in arid and semiarid area because it is hardy and provides excellent shade. It tolerates a range of well-drained soils. In landscaping, this attractive fragrant tree is ideal for shade in parks and gardens, along the seaside or indoors in a planter.

Scientific Name – Breynia cernua (syn. Breynia sp. 'Iron Range') 50 Gal Common Name – Iron Range, Red Coffee Bush

  • Breynia cernua (syn. Breynia sp. 'Iron Range') 50 Gal
  • Breynia cernua (syn. Breynia sp. 'Iron Range') 50 Gal
  • Breynia cernua (syn. Breynia sp. 'Iron Range') 50 Gal

tree profile

Height:10' - 12' Spread:6' - 8' Trunk Diameter:2 1/4'

Iron range is a small tree or bushy multi-trunked shrub reaching a height of about 6 feet and spreading to about 3 feet, with slightly weeping branches and a compact dense crown. The common name comes from a location in australia where the plant is native. Leaves are burgundy red, simple, entire, pointed, broadly lanceolate, arranged in two stepped rows on each side of the twig, each leaf 3 1/2 x 2 inches. The plant has tiny unisex greenish brown flowers; female flowers cup-like, borne on leaf axils. Fruits are globular red berries under 1/2 inch in diameter, and attract birds. Tiny seeds or sucker divisions are used for propagation. Iron range grows well in sandy, limestone soils if well-drained and is a hardy low-maintenance plant. It needs pruning to achieve tree form or to create a hedge. The distinctive reddish leaves and fruits make this an excellent accent or specimen plant in a coastal garden or patio, as well as an indoor or outdoor container plant. Published information on the taxonomy and growth requirements of iron range is incomplete; for the latter see comparable data under breynia distichia.

Scientific Name – Coccoloba diversifolia (Champion) Common Name – Pigeon Plum

  • Coccoloba diversifolia (Champion)
  • Coccoloba diversifolia (Champion)

tree profile

Height:20' - 24' Spread:6' - 8' Trunk Diameter:2" - 3"

Below find the general description for 'Coccoloba Diversifolia'.

Pigeon plum is a small to medium sized tree or shrub, commonly reaching a height of 15 - 25 feet, but can grow taller. It has a symmetrical rounded or vase-shaped dense crown with upright branching, spreading to a width equaling its height and is often multi-trunked. It has a very attractive grayish mottled bark that peels off in broad flakes as it ages. The evergreen leaves are dark green, alternate, simple, entire, oblong to ovate, leathery and about 4 inches long. Flowers are whitish-green, small but abundant borne in 2 - 3 inch long terminal clusters, blooms are about 3/16 inches across. Male and female flowers are borne on separate trees. Fruits on the female trees are borne in clusters and are small, oval to round, about 1/2 inch in diameter, with a thin flesh and single seed. Birds and animals are attracted to the fruits, which are edible but sour; they can be made into juice, jelly and wine. Seeds and cuttings are used for propagation. Pigeon plum will grow on moist well-drained soils and is quite hardy. In landscaping, it is an excellent candidate for narrow areas such as sidewalks, medians, parking lots, shorelines or suitable to provide shade in patios. It requires pruning to shape it into a tree and to control growth. One of its best applications is as a multi-trunk shrub to provide a sturdy privacy hedge. Fruit litter is a problem along walkways.

Scientific Name – Zanthoxylum fagara Common Name – Wild Lime

  • Zanthoxylum fagara

tree profile

Height:10' - 12' Spread:6' Trunk Diameter:2"

Wild Lime is a Florida native, small to medium sized tree or large shrub, typically growing to 10 - 20 feet in height and spreading in width to equal its height. It forms a cylindrical, moderate to dense, crown of numerous irregular shaped branches, which bear sharp, hooked spines. The bark is gray and rough. Leaves are bright green, deciduous, compound, alternate with 5 - 9 leaflets, which are oval to elliptical, have a notched tip and wings along the rachis, about 2 inches long. Crushed leaves give a citrus odor, an indication that it is a member of the citrus family. Male and female flowers on separate trees, they are small, inconspicuous, green-white in color, fragrant, are borne in terminal clusters and attract pollinators. The fruit is a fleshy round capsule, shiny, red ripening to black, about 1/2 inch in diameter, containing a single black seed. Birds feed on the fruits and seeds are used for propagation. Leaves and bark can be crushed to make a tart condiment, and to make medicinal tea. The yellow wood (=zanthoxylum) is used to make furniture. Wild lime can be grown in moist sandy or limestone soils with good drainage, and a surface layer of organic matter. Once established it is quite hardy. In landscaping, the appealing foliage and fruits make wild lime a good choice as a specimen or accent plant in seaside gardens and parks, and in a native plant garden. It can be formed into a hedge, grown in a container, and is suited to buffer strips around parking lots or median strips. Wild populations of this tree in florida are endangered.

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